What is the Inequality Studies minor?

The Inequality Studies minor is a new thematic minor offered within the Department of History in collaboration with the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity.

Am I eligible for the Inequality Studies minor?

All undergraduate students with an expected graduation date of May 2021 or later are eligible for the minor.

I’m not a History major. Can I still get the Inequality Studies minor?

Yes, students can pursue a unique minor in Inequality Studies independent of or alongside a major in History.

I’m currently a History major. Can my existing courses count towards the minor?

For History majors who want to minor in Inequality Studies, three courses required for the major would be allowed to overlap with requirements for the minor.

How many courses are required for the Inequality Studies minor?

The Inequality Studies minor comprises six courses: three required courses with Cook Center and three electives within the History Department.

Which courses are required?

The three required courses are as follows:

  • HISTORY 288: History of Inequality. This gateway course familiarizes students with the historical roots of inequality and ways that disparity operates across multiple axes of stigmatized identities.
    • To be taught online in Spring 2021 by Professor Darity
    • Meets Mondays 10:15am-12:45pm
    • Spaces currently available!
  • HISTORY 347: Methods in Inequality Studies. This required course trains students in the quantitative, archival, and qualitative methods necessary for interdisciplinary research on inequality.
    • To be taught online in Spring 2021 by Professor Hollowell
    • Meets Wednesday/Friday 1:45pm-3:00pm
    • Spaces currently available!
  • PUBPOL 435S / 645S: Global Inequalities Research Seminar. This successful course promotes undergraduate research on rotating themes of inequality. Taught by William “Sandy” Darity, Director of the Cook Center and Adam Hollowell, Director of the Inequality Studies Minor.
    • Spring 2021 Topic: Athletes and Activism
    • To be taught online in Spring 2021
    • Meets Tuesdays 10:15am-12:45pm
    • Open to undergraduates and graduate students!
    • Spaces currently available!

Which electives count toward the minor? 

The three electives should include:

  • One History Gateway course, typically listed between 160 – 180 with inequality themes
  • One History course at the 200-level or above with inequality themes
  • One History course at the 300-level or above with inequality themes

A provisional list of electives that would count toward the minor is available here.                   

I want to take a History elective that is not listed. Will I be able to count it towards the minor?

Additional requests for electives will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Please contact Adam Hollowell, the director of the minor in Inequality Studies, if you have a course that you feel fits these themes.

Can pass/fail classes or AP credits count towards the minor?     

Courses taken pass/fail and AP credits do not count toward the minor.

How do I declare my plan to add the Inequality Studies minor?

Students can add the minor to their plan of study using the Registrar’s Office form here: https://dukeuniversityregistrar.formstack.com/forms/academic_plan_change

Students declaring the minor should also contact Adam Hollowell, the Director of the Minor.

Where are these courses listed?

Most relevant courses will be listed under the History department within DukeHub, with the notable exception of PUBPOL 445S/PUBPOL 645S: Global Inequality Research.

HISTORY 288 and HISTORY 347 are new courses that are not currently in the course catalog, but they will be added and listed for the spring 2021 semester in time for the bookbagging period.

I have additional questions. Who should I contact?

Further questions related to the Inequality Studies minor should be directed to Adam Hollowell, the director of the minor in Inequality Studies.

If you have questions specifically related to the History department, please direct those questions to Malachi Hacohen, the director of undergraduate studies in the department.