Educated African Americans are 16% more likely to say they experience racial discrimination than those who never attended college, Pew survey finds

Thursday, May 2, 2019
Daily Mail UK

Some 76 percent of African Americans say they experience discrimination, though educated black people are 16 percent more likely to report racial bias than those who never attended college, a new survey reveals.

More than two-thirds (69 percent) of Among African Americans who have a high school degree or less said they experience racism 'from time to time,' including 9 percent who say they encounter it regularly, according to the Pew Research Center poll of black Americans.

By comparison, 81 percent of black people who have at least attended some college say they've faced discrimination – including 17 percent who say it happens regularly.

This graph breaks out the share of all African Americans, as well as those with some or more college and those who have a high school degree or less - who report experiencing discrimination from time to time vs. regularly. Source: Pew Research Center

 

This graph breaks out the share of all African Americans, as well as those with some or more college and those who have a high school degree or less - who report experiencing discrimination from time to time vs. regularly. Source: Pew Research Center

Educated African Americans are also more likely to report people acting as if they were suspicious of them - 71 percent compared to 59 percent of those who haven't attended college.

Similarly, 67 percent of educated black people say they've been treated like they weren't intelligent, compared to 52 percent of their uneducated counterparts.

Those who attended at least some college were also more likely to report being subject to slurs or jokes (58 percent compared to 45 percent); being treated unfairly in hiring, pay or promotion (52 percent compared to 45 percent); and having feared for their personal safety (50 percent compared to 34 percent).

Some 44 percent of African Americans report being unfairly stopped by police, and educated black people are only slightly more likely to say they've experienced this (46 percent compared to 42 percent).

A quarter of black people say that people have assumed they were prejudiced – and on that point the uneducated cohort was slightly more likely to experience this (23 percent compared to 26 percent of educated African Americans).

This graph illustrates the share of all African Americans, as well as those with some or more college and those who have a high school degree or less - who have experienced various racist experiences, with more educated black people more likely to report encountering most types of discrimination. Source: Pew Research Center

College-educated African Americans are also more likely to say that their race has harmed their ability to succeed – 57 percent compared to 47 percent of uneducated black people.

The findings are consistent with previous research and polls by Pew and others.

William A. Darity Jr., a professor of public policy at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University, has suggested that educated African Americans are more likely to work in predominately white settings, which could expose them to more racial discrimination.

Others have said that college can provide African Americans with more exposure to the issues of race and discrimination, thus elevating their awareness and sensitivity to those experiences.

Self-reported experiences of racism are also split along gender lines, with black men far more likely than women to say they've been unfairly stopped by the police (59 percent compared to 31 percent).

Black men were also more likely to report people acting as if they were suspicious of them (73 percent compared to 59 percent), or subject them to racial slurs or jokes (57 percent compared to 49 percent).

This graph illustrates the share of black men and women who have experienced various racist experiences, with black men more likely to self-report encountering discrimination. Source: Pew Research Center

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