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Fall 2018: “Examining Neuroscience, Genetics, and Inequality”

Fall 2018: “Examining Neuroscience, Genetics, and Inequality”

The 2018 Fall GIRI seminar explored controversial and important issues related to race, genetics and inequality, how they are studied, and whether (and how) such studies should inform medical practice, criminal and other legal actions, personal identity claims, health disparities, and social policy.

Should we phase out the use of racial terminology in biological sciences? If so, will the conventional terminology be replaced by new language that preserves the same ideas? And are those ideas actually incorrect? If we deem illegitimate genetic explanations for differences in group-based behaviors and outcomes, is there still a space for genetic explanations for differences in individual behaviors and outcomes? The seminar convened on Wednesdays from 11:45 AM – 2:15 PM in Biological Sciences Room 113.

GIRI Capstone Conference: “Examining Neuroscience, Genetics, and Inequality”
Rubenstein Library – Duke University
Friday, November 30, 2018

Should we phase out the use of racial terminology in biological sciences? If so, will the conventional terminology be replaced by new language that preserves the same ideas? And are those ideas actually incorrect? If we deem illegitimate genetic explanations for differences in group-based behaviors and outcomes, is there still a space for genetic explanations for differences in individual behaviors and outcomes? The Global Inequality Research Initiative Capstone Conference on Neuroscience, Genetics, and Inequality explored these issues. The conference featured a keynote address from Erin E. Murphy, Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, Sanford School of Public Policy graduate students, and GIRI student research presentations.