Post-racial rhetoric, racial health disparities, and health disparity consequences of stigma, stress, and racism

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
The Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Persistent disparate health outcomes between black and white Americans are a major contributor to the United States’ poor performance on international measures of health. These disparities cannot be explained by socioeconomic status alone. While health outcomes generally improve with socioeconomic status, the disparity in health outcomes between black and white Americans not only persists but often worsens with higher socioeconomic status."

In his new working paper, "Post-racial rhetoric, racial health disparities, and health disparity consequences of stigma, stress, and racism,” Professor Darrick Hamilton, Associate Director of Cook Center; Co-Investigator of the National Asset Scorecard for Communities of Color (NASCC) Project and Associate Professor of Economics and Urban Policy, Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy & Department of Economics, New School for Social Research, explores this paradox, placing it within the context of neoliberal rhetoric and the political narrative that the United States has entered a “post-racial” era, and I propose a new framework for empirical research to explore and explain this trend.

Read the full article and paper here.