Does College Level the Playing Field? Racial and Ethnic Differences in Family Wealth Among College-Educated Families

Friday, June 17, 2016
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Recent research led by William R. Emmons, senior economic adviser at the St. Louis Fed's Center for Household Financial Stability, found that a college degree predicted rising levels of family wealth between 1992 and 2013 for whites and Asians, but declining levels of wealth over that same period for blacks and Hispanics. Through commissioned papers, the May 25-26, 2016, research symposium at the St. Louis Fed Does College Level the Playing Field? Racial and Ethnic Differences in Family Wealth Among College-Educated Families aimed to better understand the underlying reasons for this troubling finding, which generated coverage from The New York Times and many other national and local media outlets.

William "Sandy" Darity, Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy and founding director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity, participated in a keynote conversation with Ray Boshara, Senior Adviser and Director, Center for Household Financial Stability, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis during the symposium. Darrick Hamilton, Associate Professor of Economics and Urban Policy, The New School and Faculty Affiliate and Co-Investigator of the National Asset Scorecard for Communities of Color (NASCC) also presented during the symposium on The Role of Inheritances and Family Transfers and The Pre- and Post-College Experiences.

Video of the presentations can be found below: